Crowdfunding, Electronic Giving Soulution, Online Donations, Peer to Peer Funding

Tips for Saying Thank You

Saying Thank You

It is always important to say thank you to your donors for supporting your organization. But more than saying thank you, let them know how their support has impacted your mission! 77% of donors believe everyone can make a difference by supporting a cause. (1) An engaged donor is more likely to donate again.

 

Tips for Saying Thank You:

  • Send out an email saying “Thank You” in the subject line. Research shows that emails with a statement of thanks in the subject line are 38-69% more likely to be read. (2)
  • Share a story. There is no better way to show a donor their impact than with a testimonial from someone who has been impacted by their giving.
  • Only if necessary use words. Share a picture or use a graph to show donors how their contribution has been put to work.

 

You can use your EGS Donor Statistical Graph to download a list of your active donors and then do a mail merge with your email provider to send your thank you email. Below are the steps when using Microsoft Outlook, Excel, and Word.

 

From the Dashboard, view your Donor Statistical box at the bottom of your page. Click on View All to download your CSV spreadsheet.

 

Thank you

 

Filter and edit your spreadsheet so that only the columns with the first name, last name, and email address are showing. Then save your document.

 

Thank you 1

Thank you 2

Thank you 3

Next, open a new Microsoft Word document. Then click on Mailingsà Start Mail Merge à then E-mail Messages.

Thank you 4

 

Next, click on Select Recipients à Use an Existing List à then choose your saved spreadsheet.

 

Thank you 5

After you have finished writing your letter click on Finish & Merge then Send Email Messages…

 

Thank you 6

 

Then give your email a subject. Don’t forget to say thank you in your subject line! Then click ok. When you click ok, your message will be sent. If you check your sent folder in Outlook, you can view all your sent messages.

Thank you 7

 

 

Sources:

(1)https://nonprofitssource.com/online-giving-statistics/

(2)https://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2018/34703/the-impact-of-saying-thanks-in-email-subject-lines

Crowdfunding, Electronic Giving Soulution, Peer to Peer Funding

Its time to get social with your donors.

The great thing about Stewardship Technology’s giving links is that they can be used anywhere, ANYTIME. This includes all your social media pages. In 2017, 75% of donors said that they used social media to stay updated with their favorite organizations. While your donors are looking at your Facebook page, make sure you provide your giving links for them to give!

Here are a few quick tips and tricks from our team, have you tried:

  • Go live on Facebook to promote your upcoming event. Then let your audience know where they can find your giving link to get involved.
  • Update your Facebook page with a “Donate Now” button linking it to your donation page.
  • Post a picture on Instagram showing results of a donation impact.
  • Send a Tweet to your donors thanking them for their donation.
  • Donors want to share with their friends what they’re passionate about, ask them to share your cause on their social pages.

 

When it comes to long-term strategy, what fundraisers must realize is that there are typically several steps between acquiring social media followers and turning them into financial supporters. Below are a few tactics that will help you cross this bridge and turn social media followers into donors.

1. Post a Variety of Engaging Content

A key part of any successful social media strategy is a mix of engaging posts and conversation starters, not a stream of donation appeals. In fact, when it comes to social media, millennials’ top pet peeves are coming across the same content constantly and getting hit with asks over and over again .

While there’s a place for appeals in your strategy, foster your followers’ connection to your organization by prioritizing storytelling and educational opportunities in your various content pieces. Focus on the following types of posts:

Supporter Recognition

Dedicate a major chunk of your social media strategy to recognizing donors, fundraisers, and volunteers. This can look like tagging them and thanking them directly for their gift, or you might retweet fundraisers’ posts that promote their personal fundraising pages.

Impact Highlights

Showcase your organization’s work through videos, info-graphics, impact stories, testimonials, and blog posts. Include a link back to your website to drive that next touch point.

Cause Awareness

Beyond your organization’s own impact and focus, offer valuable information related to the wider issue you address and what’s going on in the space. Share timely and relevant content from other thought leaders, news and media outlets, or organizations to elevate a broader discussion about the social problem.

Asks

Direct donation appeals should make up only a fraction of your social media content, since you don’t want to bombard followers with hard asks. When you do ask followers to make a gift, tailor your language so that supporters can connect the act of a contribution and their core sense of identity—who they believe themselves to be as individuals. They should also be able to identify the difference they can make through their gift. Suggest specific donation amounts that are tied to tangible results.

Donation appeals are not the only types of asks to weave into your documented social strategy. As a softer ask, you also want to encourage supporters to sign up for your newsletter.

As you try out a mix of these post types, make sure to track engagement to see which content supporters are responding to and adapt your monthly plan accordingly.

2. Hook Donors in With a Separate Compelling Story

When thinking of how to turn social media followers into donors, organizations naturally want to reach out to people who directly follow their brand on social media. But sometimes, the trick is to think beyond just reeling in those fans.

One thing to consider is that rather than seeking out and following your organization’s page on social media, prospective donors can be instantly hooked by another catalyzing story or event that they may choose to follow and support, which then introduces them to your organization.

As you think about how to turn social media followers into donors, consider whether you can create (or already have) a compelling event, story, or element that would engage your audience, and throw promotional efforts behind it on social media. You might create its own peer-to-peer page through Together We Raise that includes links back to your website and business profile page, so followers have the opportunity to take action and connect with your broader organization.

3. Acquire Email Addresses

One of the major ways to turn social media followers into donors, hands down, is to first convert them into email subscribers. Your posts should drive people back to your website where you can collect their email addresses through an updated signup box.

Email acquisition is key to increasing your number of prospective donors. It allows you to maintain an elective conversation with anyone who lands on your site, including those social media followers who click through your posts. When you’re able to loop them into your regular communication cycle, you can start to strengthen the relationship on a more consistent, personalized basis.

When it comes to turning social media followers into donors, the goal is to effectively engage them with relevant content and drive them back to your website. Site visitors then have an opportunity to learn more about your organization, sign up for your email updates, and/or donate. With each post, determine whether you are offering a valuable piece of information that encourages a long-lasting relationship with your followers. Then you can start leveraging your social profile as a portal that leads to greater levels of support.

Crowdfunding, Electronic Giving Soulution, Peer to Peer Funding

Why your organization needs to start using Crowdfunding right now!

TWR Logo

Crowdfunding is the best way to expand your donor base. When engaging in crowdfunding, 62% of those who donate are new and 28% of those new donors will give again.

Thinking realistically, a $1 donation will not help a nonprofit organization very much; however, one million donations of $1 can help a nonprofit mobilize their cause. This is where crowdfunding comes in because donors can see that many people, some of whom they know and some they do not, are donating in many different quantities.

Crowdfunding pages stress the importance of donating money whether it be small or large–they utilize a group model instead of a singular model. When you donate to a crowdfunding campaign you become part of a group that is supporting that cause no matter how much you donate. On the other side, when you donate to a text to donate or text to give campaign, you are simply one person supporting an organization. Mobilizing donors to give gifts of all sizes can result in a massive fundraising effort.

Nonprofit crowdfunding is changing the landscape in online fundraising. As more and more donors are being exposed to crowdfunding for products and services, they’ll expect your fundraising to shift towards those approaches as well.

Here are five best practices to crowdfund successfully for your nonprofit.

1.  Start with a measurable goal

Your goal aligns your team and supporters with your crowdfunding campaign. You have to find a balance between what is within reach and what is an aspiration. If you’ve fundraised online before, ask yourself a few questions to get a baseline of what is achievable.

2.  Rethink Rewards and Donation Tiers

Rewards are items, recognition, or a service that you’ll get for contributing a crowdfunding campaign. They are also known as perks or gifts, and are used as incentives to motivate people to support a campaign.

3. Create your eye-catching story

You know that compelling stories get you donations, sharing, and publicity, but you’re probably thinking — “I don’t have a eye-catching story” or “I don’t know how to tell a compelling story”. It’s actually easier than you think to create one that works. Think about your mission and how your mission serves the community, your story is there.

4.  Build a tribe of champions

Contrary to what you may assume, you can’t launch a crowdfunding campaign by relying on the crowd. You’ll need to cultivate a tribe. Start with a list of 100 people that you know and would be willing to take action and put them in three buckets: Promoters, Fundraisers, Donors.

Give each bucket a role and goal so that they know how and when to help. Some people can take on multiple roles if they’re high up on the engagement ladder.

5.  Focus on your crowdfunding page

Getting started with crowdfunding is easy, but doing it right can be a challenge. You can learn more details on how to launch a nonprofit crowdfunding campaign by contacting our team of experts at Stewardship Technology.

 

 

Peer to Peer Funding

Peer to Peer & Crowdfunding

church-2464899_1280

Peer to peer fundraising and crowdfunding are commonly used interchangeably. However, the two are very different and can benefit your organization in different ways. Crowdfunding can be used by individuals and nonprofits where peer to peer fundraising can only be used by nonprofits.

Essentially, crowdfunding involves a fundraiser asking for a direct donation and peer to peer fundraising asks for supporters to donate to their page and then send in the entire contribution to the nonprofit’s campaign.

Peer to Peer & Crowdfunding

These are two great options for raising money for your organization, depending on what you plan on doing can help decide which one will work best for that particular fundraiser. Peer to peer fundraising is known as the social fundraising technique. When enlisting the help of your supporters to fundraise on your behalf, it typically needs to be tied to some sort of event.

The Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk is a perfect example of peer to peer fundraising perfectly executed. This fundraiser has become a household name that almost everyone is familiar with. When people sign up to participate in the 3-Day walk, each is responsible for letting their friends and families know they are raising money for the walk and in that way, obtain “sponsors.” After collecting the donations from all of their sponsors, the participants than in turn donate all of the money to the Susan G. Komen 3-day Breast Cancer Foundation.

Crowdfunding has a different approach to the fact the organization asks for donations directly after explaining what they are raising money for.

A great example of crowdfunding is when someone or an organization set up a GoFundMe. When there is a GoFundMe or a similar donation site set up, there are usually pictures and an explanation of what the raised money will be going towards. Along with the explanation, there is typically a tracker that lets people know what the goal is, how much money has been raised towards it and how much time is left in the fundraiser.

This is also a great option to reach many people because when someone donates, many times you can share on multiple social media platforms the fundraiser happening, so the organization’s donors are promoting the fundraiser for them.

Although very opposing options in the sense of being executed differently, they both have the same end goal in mind. Choosing which will work best for your organization, you will need to weigh the pros and cons of each. It is possible that both could work for your organization for different fundraising needs.

When beginning a peer to peer fundraiser, a lot of groundwork has to be done opposed to crowdfunding. With crowdfunding, you start the fundraiser online and set up the donation page and let the donors do the rest. With peer to peer fundraising, you have to get volunteers involved who are passionate about your organization but also trustworthy.

They will be the face of your fundraiser when out collecting donations from strangers or sponsors. Although possible, it can be difficult to track how much each volunteer is raising if cash donations are being collected. You want to make sure you have honest and trustworthy volunteers at the forefront of your organization’s fundraiser.

Peer to peer fundraising is a lot of work for a team to arrange but can be very rewarding since it is shared on so many platforms by so many different people, there is an opportunity to reach so many potential donors and new networks of people.

With peer to peer funding, there has to be something these volunteers are going out and raising money for. There needs to be a marathon or a dance-a-thon, or like the 3-day foundation, a 3-day walk organized and coordinated. The volunteers raising money for your organization are typically offering themselves to participate in the event if people pay to support them.

When your organization creates a peer to peer fundraiser, it can become something that is done annually, and that way builds a reputation, and your organization can become recognized as the ones who put on that event. When planning on making something annual, all of the hard work that went into planning the original peer to peer fundraiser can be reused when planning for the next one.

Peer to Peer Funding

Peer to Peer Fundraising and Crowdfunding

picture of words with peer to peer fundraising and crowdfunding

Peer to peer fundraising and crowdfunding are commonly used interchangeably, however, the two are very different and can benefit your organization in different ways. Crowdfunding can be used by individuals and nonprofits where peer to peer fundraising can only be used by nonprofits. Essentially, crowdfunding involves a fundraiser asking for a direct donation and peer to peer fundraising asks for supporters to donate to their individual page and then send in the entire donation to the nonprofits campaign.

These are two great options for raising money for your organization, depending on what you plan on doing can help decide which one will work best for that particular fundraiser. Peer to peer fundraising is known as the social fundraising technique. When enlisting the help of your supporters to raise money on your behalf, it typically needs to be tied to some sort of event.

The Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk is a perfect example of peer to peer fundraising perfectly executed.

Peer to Peer Fundraising and Crowd Funding

This fundraiser has become a household name that almost everyone is familiar with. When people sign up to participate in the 3-Day walk, each individual is responsible for letting their friends and families know they are raising money for the walk and in that way, obtain “sponsors”. After collecting the donations from all of their sponsors, the participants then in turn donate all of the money to the Susan G. Komen 3-day Breast Cancer Foundation.

Crowdfunding has a different approach in the fact the organization asks for donations directly after explaining what they are raising money for.  A great example of crowdfunding is when someone or an organization sets up a GoFundMe. When there is a GoFundMe or a similar donation site set up, there are usually pictures and an explanation with what the raised money will be going towards.

Along with the explanation there is typically a tracker that lets people know what the goal is, how much money has been raised towards it and how much time is left in the fundraiser. This is also a great option to reach many people because when someone donates, many times you can share on multiple social media platforms the fundraiser happening, so the organizations donors are promoting the fundraiser for them.

Although very opposing options in the sense of being executed differently, they both have the same end goal in mind. Choosing which will work best for your organization, you will need to weigh the pros and cons of each.  It is possible that both could work for your organization for different fundraising needs.

When beginning a peer to peer fundraiser, a lot of ground work has to be done opposed to crowdfunding. With crowdfunding, you start the fundraiser online and set up the donation page and let the donors do the rest. With peer to peer fundraising, you have to get volunteers involved who are passionate about your organization but also trustworthy. They will really be the face of your fundraiser when out collecting donations from strangers or sponsors. Although possible, it can be difficult to track how much each individual volunteer is raising if there are cash donations being collected. You want to make sure you have honest and trustworthy volunteers on the forefront of your organizations fundraiser.

Peer to peer fundraising is a lot for an organization to arrange but can be very rewarding since it is shared on so many platforms by so many different people, there is opportunity to reach so many potential donors and new networks of people.

With peer to peer funding, there has to be something these volunteers are going out and raising money for. There needs to be a marathon or a dance-a-thon or like the 3-day foundation, a 3-day walk organized and coordinated. The volunteers raising money for your organization are typically offering themselves to participate in the event if people will pay to support them.

When your organization creates a peer to peer fundraiser, it can become something that is done annually and that way builds a reputation and your organization can become recognized as the ones who put on that event. When planning on making something annual, all of the hard work that went into planning the original peer to peer fundraiser can be reused when planning for the next one.

If you’re looking for a solution to help you live out your mission, email the experts at stewardship technology. They focus on providing a complete suite of products to ensure your nonprofit is fulfilling its mission.